Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Do Re Mi (Woody Guthrie)

By Woody Guthrie
Rise Up Singing chapter: Rich and Poor, p.181

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Turn Around


By Malvina Reynolds, Alan Greene and Harry Belafonte
Rise Up Singing chapter: Time and Changes, p.228
C Em F G / C Em F G / C C7 F Fm / C Dm G C
C - C7 - / F Em G C

Monday, September 28, 2009

Roll the Union On


By John L. Handcox and Lee Hays
Rise Up Singing chapter: Work, p.258
Chorus: G - / - D7 / - - / - G
Verses: G - / D7 G ://

We're gonna roll, we're gonna roll
We're gonna roll the union on (repeat)

1.If the boss is in the way we're gonna roll it over him/her...

Sunday, September 27, 2009

Jacob's Ladder / We Are Building A Strong Union


This one is instructional for Jacob's Ladder as well as Sarah's Circle and We Are Building a Strong Union, which are all to the same tune.
The words are by some Marion, North Carolina Textile workers and the melody is Jacob's Ladder, a traditional Black American spiritual
Rise Up Singing chapter: Work, p.260
A - - - / E - D A / A A7 D A / - E A -
I do it in D:
D - - - / A - G D / D D7 G D / - A D -

Alternate chords at the end of the video (from the ACA Let's All Sing! songbook)
D - - - / A - AA7 GD / D Bm G GD / - A D -

We are building a strong union (3x) / Workers in the mill!
Every member makes us stronger...
We won't budge until we conquer...
We shall rise and gain our freedom

We are climbing Jacob's ladder (3x) / Soldiers of the cross
or
We are climbing Jacob's ladder (3x) / Brothers, sisters, all
Every rung goes higher and higher...

Saturday, September 26, 2009

R.U.S. Bonus: Cowboys

I got the idea to record this song from Sam Love on Helveticaukes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBf8vc...
She's not the friend I'm thinking of though.
It should be said that, according to Wikipedia: "Ann Northrop of Gay USA describes the lyrics as 'the language of thirty years ago.'" For what that's worth.

Lyrics:

There's many a strange impulse out on the plains of West Texas;
There's many a young boy who feels things he don't comprehend.
Well small town don't like it when somebody falls between sexes,
No, small town don't like it when a cowboy has feelings for men.

Well I believe in my soul that inside every man there's a feminine,
And inside every lady there's a deep manly voice loud and clear.
Well, a cowboy may brag about things that he does with his women,
But the ones who brag loudest are the ones that are most likely queer.

Cowboys are frequently secretly fond of each other
What did you think those saddles and boots was about?
There's many a cowboy who don't understand
the way that he feels towards his brother,
Inside every cowboy there's a lady who'd love to slip out.

Ten men for each woman was the rule way back when on the prairie,
And somehow those cowboys must have kept themselves warm late at night.
Cowboys are famous for getting riled up about fairies,
But I'll tell you the reason a big strong man gets so uptight:

Cowboys are frequently secretly fond of each other
That's why they wear leather, and Levi's and belts buckled tight.
There's many a cowboy who don't understand
the way that he feels towards his brother;
There's many a cowboy who's more like a lady at night.

Well there's always somebody who says what the others just whisper,
And mostly that someone's the first one to get shot down dead:
When you talk to a cowboy don't treat him like he was a sister
Don't mess with the lady that's sleepin' in each cowboy's head.

Cowboys are frequently secretly fond of each other
Even though they take speed and drive pickups and shoot their big guns;
There's many a cowboy who don't understand
the way that he feels towards his brother;
There's many a cowboy who keeps quiet about things he's done.

Bonus, Gay, Cowboy, love, bigotry, inclusiveness, queer, Texas, country, song, music, chords, lyrics, easy guitar

Friday, September 25, 2009

Which Side Are You On?


Words by Florence Reece; melody, traditional (Lay the Lily Low)
Rise Up Singing chapter: Work, p.260
Am - Em Am / Em Am E Am / Am - E Am (repeat this last line if you like the chorus twice like I do)

Come all of you good workers, good news to you I'll tell
Of how the good old union has come in here to dwell
Which side are you on (boys)? Which side are you on?

My daddy was a miner, he's now in the air and sun
And I'll stick to the union till every battle's won
or
My daddy was a miner, and I'm a miner's son
And I'll stick to the union till every battle's won

They say in Harlan County, there are no neutrals there
You're either with the union, or a thug for J.H. Blair

Oh, workers, can you stand it? Oh, tell me how you can
Will you be a crummy scab or lend us all a hand?

Don't scab for the bosses, don't listen to their lies
Us poor folks haven't got a chance unless we organise

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Will the Circle be Unbroken

Traditional American
New version (at the end) by Cathy Winter, Betsy Rose and Marcia Taylor
Chords: D - G D / - - DA7 D

Chorus:
Will the circle be unbroken by and by, Lord, by and by?
There's a better home a-waiting in the sky, Lord, in the sky

I was standing by my window on a cold and cloudy day
When I saw the hearse a-coming for to carry my mother away

Lord, I told that undertaker, "Undertaker, please drive slow
For this body you're a-hauling, Lord, I hate to see her go"

I followed close behind her, tried to hold up and be brave
But I could not hide my sorrow when they

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Crawdad


Traditional American
Rise Up Singing chapter: p.151
E - / - B7 / EE7 A7 / EB7 E

You get a line and I'll get a pole, honey
You get a line and I'll get a pole, babe
You get a line and I'll get a pole, we'll go down to the crawdad hole
Honey, sugar baby, mine

Get up old man, you slept too late, honey...
...crawdad man done passed your gate...
Yonder come a man with a sack on his back
...packin' all the crawdads he can pack
The man fall down and he bust his sack
...hey, look at them crawdads back in back
What you gonna do when the lake goes dry
...sit on the bank and watch crawdads die
What you gonna do when the crawdads die
...sit on the bank until I cry
Crawdad sitting on the riverbank
...pickin his teeth with a two-by-four plank
Look at that crawdad crawlin' 'round
...he's the mayor of crawdad town
I heard the duck say to the drake
...there ain't no crawdads in this lake

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Country Roads (new collaborator!)


pg. 150 of Rise Up Singing, by Bill Danoff, Taffy Nivert & John Denver. The chapter is Mountain Voices!

Capo 4th fret to sing it in the key I do it in, B major. Or whatever suits your voice!

Verse:
G - Em - / D - C G ://

Chorus:
G - D - / Em - C - / G - D - / C - G -

Bridge:
Em D G - / C G D - / Em F C G / D - D7 -

Man of Constant Sorrow (pattern two)

It was the Bob Dylan version all along!

Traditional American
Rise Up Singing chapter: Mountain Voices, p.147
Chords: D G C / D G ://

Monday, September 21, 2009

Cindy


Another traditional American song (a great one)
Rise Up Singing chapter: Mountain Voices, p.143
Chords: D - - A / D G A D / G - D - / G - A D

You ought to see my Cindy, she lives away down south
She's so sweet the honey bees come swarming 'round her mouth
Get along home, Cindy, Cindy, get along home I say
Get along home, Cindy, Cindy, I'll marry you some day
[I sing another "...Cindy, Cindy" in lieu of "...I say"]

The first I seen my Cindy, she was standing in the door
Her shoes and stockings in her hand, her feet all over the floor

She took me to her parlor, she cooled me with her fan
She said I was the prettiest thing in the shape of mortal man

She kissed me and she hugged me, she called me sugar plum
She trowed her arms around me, I thought my time had come

Cindy got religion, she'd had it once before
But when she heard my old banjo, she "uz the first one on the floor

When Cindy got religion, she shouted all around
She got so full of glory, she shook her stockings down
[or: She knocked the preacher down]

I wish I had a needle as fine as I could sew
I'd sew the girls to my coattail and down the road I'd go

I wish I was an apple a-hangin on a tree
And every time my Cindy passed, she'd take a bite o' me

Cindy in the springtime, Cindy in the fall
If I can't have my own Cindy, I'll have no girl at all

Sunday, September 20, 2009

John Henry


A traditional American song
Rise Up Singing chapter: Mountain Voices, p.146
Facts on the John Henry legend: http://www.ibiblio.org/john_henry/
Tons of different versions of the lyrics here: http://www.ibiblio.org/john_henry/lyrics1.html

A - / - E / A D7 / A D7 / AE A
John Henry was a little baby
Sitting on his papa's knee
He picked up a hammer and a little piece of steel
Said "This hammer's gonna be the death of me, Lord, Lord
This hammer's gonna be the death of me"

The captain said to John Henry
"Gonna bring that steam drill 'round
Gonna bring that steam drill out on the job
Gonna whop that steel on down, Lord, Lord
Gonna whop that steel on down

John Henry told his captain
"A man ain't nothing but a man
But before I let your steam drill beat me down
I'd die with a hammer in my hand...

John Henry said to his shaker
"Shaker, why don't you sing?
I'm throwing thirty pounds from my hips on down
Just listen to that cold steel ring..."

John Henry said to his shaker
"Shaker why don't you pray?
'Cause if I miss that little piece of steel
Tomorrow's gonna be your burying day..."

The shaker said to John Henry
"I believe this mountain's caving in"
John Henry said to his shaker, "Man
That ain't nothing but my hammer sucking wind..."

The man that invented the steam drill
Thought he was mighty fine
But John Henry made fifteen feet
The steam drill only made nine...

(I forgot this verse):
John Henry hammered in the mountain
His hammer was striking fire
But he worked so hard, he broke his poor heart
He laid down his hammer and he died...

John Henry had a little woman
Her name was Polly Ann
John Henry took sick and went to his bed
Polly Ann drove steel like a man...
----------------------------------------------
"Now John Henry was a mighty man, yes sir. He was born a slave in the 1840's but was freed after the war. He went to work as a steel-driver for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, don't ya know. And John Henry was the strongest, the most powerful man working the rails.
John Henry, he would spend his day's drilling holes by hitting thick steel spikes into rocks with his faithful shaker crouching close to the hole, turning the drill after each mighty blow. There was no one who could match him, though many tried."
Read the rest here: http://www.americanfolklore.net/folktales/wv2.html

Saturday, September 19, 2009

When I'm Gone

Mary Travers died yesterday.
It takes a lot to be one of the best-loved Marys in the world, in a category headed by the mother of Jesus.
So, with love and respect, here's a song by Phil Ochs that speaks to me when I think about life and death and the people who do the kind of work that Mary Travers did.

Rise Up Singing chapter: Time and Changes, p.229
Chords in video: D - Bm - / Em - A - / D A Bm - / Em A D -
R.U.S. chords:
D - Bm - / Em - A - / D F#m Bm - / Em A D -

There's no place in this world where I'll belong when I'm gone
And I won't know the right from the wrong when I'm gone
And you won't find me singing on this song when I'm gone
So I guess I'll have to do it while I'm here

And I won't feel the flowing of the time when I'm gone
All the pleasures of love will not be mine when I'm gone
My pen won't pour out a lyric line when I'm gone
So I guess I'll have to do it while I'm here

And I won't breathe the brandy air when I'm gone
And I can't even worry 'bout my cares when I'm gone
Won't be asked to do my share when I'm gone
So I guess I'll have to do it while I'm here

And I won't be running from the rain when I'm gone
And I can't even suffer from the pain when I'm gone
There's nothing I can lose or I can gain when I'm gone
So I guess I'll have to do it while I'm here

I Won't see the golden of the sun when I'm gone
And my evenings and my mornings will be one when I'm gone
Can't be singing louder than the guns when I'm gone
So I guess I'll have to do it while I'm here

All my days won't be dances of delight when I'm gone
And the sands will be shifting from my sight when I'm gone
Can't add my name into the fight when I'm gone
So I guess I'll have to do it while I'm here

And I won't be laughing at the lies when I'm gone
And I can't question how or when or why when I'm gone
Can't live proud enough to die when I'm gone
So I guess I'll have to do it while I'm here

Friday, September 18, 2009

Rosh Hashanah bonus: Shofar Blast


Today's news: Rest in peace, Mary Travers.

By Peter and Ellen Allard
A song for Rosh Hashana / Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year), which I learned just a week ago from stinkyknits, a new internet friend. Here's her version (on ukulele)

The sheet music, including chords for guitar, can be found here. But for the click-lazy:
Am Dm E Am / - Dm EE7 Am / E7fermata ://

I like to hear the shofar blast, sometimes slow and sometimes fast
I like to hear the shofar blast, happy happy happy new year!
T'ki ahhhhhhhhhhhh!
etc.

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Bouns: Groundhog


A song I learned off an album (a "twofer") called The Essential Doc Watson, which I picked up when I was 19 or 20, I guess. Sometime around then.
G D G - / - C G - / - D G - / - D G -

Shoulder up your gun and whistle up your dog

Shoulder up your gun and whistle up your dog
We're off to the woods for to catch a groundhog.
Oh, groundhog

Run here Sally with a ten foot pole (2x)
Gonna twist that whistle-pig out of his hole
Oh, groundhog

Here comes Sal with a snicker and a grin (2x)
Groundhog gravy all over her chin

I dug down but I didn't dig deep (2x)
There lay a whistle-pig fast asleep

Now there's meat in the cupboard and butter in the churn (2x)
If that ain't groundhog I'll be derned

Well you eat up the meat and you save the hide (2x)
The best darn shoestring ever was tied

Look at them fellers, they're about to fall (2x)
Gonna eat 'til their britches won't button at all

There's a little piece of cornbread a-layin' on the shelf (2x)
If you want any more, you can sing it yerself

And a verse I skipped:
Look at them fellers, they're a-goin' wild
They're gonna eat that hog before he's cooked or biled

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Let Us Break Bread Together


A.K.A. "Break Bread"
A traditional Black American spiritual
Rise Up Singing chapter: Spirituals, p.210
CAm FG CF C / Em FD GD G
C C7 F Fm / CAm FG C (F C)

in D
DBm GA DG / F#m GE AE A
D D7 G Gm / DBm GA D (G D)

Let us break bread together on our knees, on our knees
Let us break bread together on our knees, on our knees
When I fall on my knees with my face to the rising sun
Oh Lord, have mercy on me

Let us drink wine together on our knees...

Let us praise God together on our knees...

Suicide Prevention International
Suicide in Asia
The World Health Organization on suicide prevention

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Tell Me Why


(Song begins at 0:58)
Traditional American love song
Rise Up Singing chapter: Love, p.128
G - C G / - - A D / G - C B7 / E A D G

Tell me why the stars do shine Tell me why the ivy twine Tell me why the skies are blue And I will tell you just why I love you Because God made the stars to shine Because God made the ivy twine Because God made the skies so blue Because God made you is why I love you

The Beach Boys did a version of this on the album Beach Boys' Party, and I learned it from the Let's All Sing songbook, published a long time ago by the American Camping Association (ACA).

Monday, September 14, 2009

Ol' Texas (Old Texas)


(Song begins at 2:15)
Traditional
Rise Up Singing chapter: Farm and Prairie, p.55
D - - - / A G D - ://

I'm going to leave old Texas now
They've got no use for the long-horned cow (longhorn cow)
They've plowed and fenced my cattle range
And the people there are all so strange

I'll take my horse, I'll take my rope
And I'll hit the trail upon a lope
I'll bid adios to the Alamo
And I'll turn my head toward Mexico

Sunday, September 13, 2009

Hallelujah, I'm a Bum

(Song begins at 0:28)
Here's Lewdite, whom I mention in the video. I don't know where he picked up the line "how can I work when the sky is so blue?" but I know I picked it up from him (via YouTube).
http://www.youtube.com/user/lewdite

Rise Up Singing chapter: Rich and Poor, p.181
Words by Harry McClintock; melody by John J. Husband ("Revive Us Again")
G - - - / - - - D / G - - D / G C D G

Oh why don't you work, like other men do?
How can I work when there's no work to do?
Hallelujah, I'm a bum, hallelujah, bum again
Hallelujah give us a handout to revive us again
(Alt: How can I work when the sky is so blue?)

I went to a house, I knocked on the door
The lady said, "Scram, bum, you've been here before"
Hallelujah...

Whenever I get all the money I earn
The boss will go broke and to work he must turn...

Oh, I love my boss, he's a good friend of mine
That's why I am starving out on the bread line...

Oh why don't you save all the money you earn?
If I didn't eat, I'd have money to burn...

Saturday, September 12, 2009

Man of Constant Sorrow

G C / Am G
That's what Rise Up Singing has. I play this:
G C / D7 G

Actually, I play D most of the way, but realize at the end that D7 sounds better.

Friday, September 11, 2009

Victor Jara


Words by Adrian Mitchel, melody by Arlo Guthrie
Rise Up Singing chapter: Struggle, p.219
Chords:
D - G D / G D Em G / A7sus A7 D -
or
D - G D / G D Em G / A7 G D -

Victor Jara of Chile lived like a shooting star
He fought for the people of Chile with his songs and his guitar
His hands were gentle, his hands were strong

Victor Jara was a peasant, worked from a few years old
He sat upon his father's plow and watched the earth unfold
His hands were gentle, his hands were strong

When the neighbors had a wedding, or one of their children died
His mother sang all night for them with Victor by her side
His hands were gentle, his hands were strong

He grew up to be a fighter against the people's wrongs
He listened to their grief and joy and turned them into songs
His hands were gentle, his hands were strong

He sang about the copper miners and those who worked the lands
He sang about the factory workers and they knew he was their man
His hands were gentle, his hands were strong

He campaigned for Allende, working both night and day
He sang, "Take hold your brothers' hands, the future begins today"
His hands were gentle, his hands were strong

Then the generals seized Chile, they arrested Victor then
The caged him in a stadium with five thousand frightened men
His hands were gentle, his hands were strong

Victor stood in the stadium, his voice was brave and strong
And he sang for his fellow prisoners til the guards cut short his song
His hands were gentle, his hands were strong

They broke the bones in both his hands, they beat him on the head
They tore him with electric shocks and then they shot him dead
His hands were gentle, his hands were strong

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Bonus: The Foggy Dew (Irish revolutionary song)


Chords:
Am - G - C AmG Am - / Am G C AmG Am -

C - G C Am FEm Am - / Am - G - C AmG Am -

Or, more in the R.U.S style of notation:
Am - G - C AmG Am - / / C - G C Am FEm Am - / 1st

As down the glen one Easter morn, to a city fair rode I
There armed lines of marching men in squadrons passed me by
No pipes did hum, no battle drum, did sound its loud tattoo
But the Angelus bell o'er the Liffey swell, rang out in the foggy dew

Right proudly high in Dublin town, they flung out the flag of war
'Twas better to die 'neath an Irish sky than at Suvla or Sud El Bar
And from the plains of Royal Meath strong men came hurrying through
While Britannia's huns with their long range guns sailed in through the foggy dew

O, the night fell black and the rifles' crack made 'Perfidious Abion' reel
'Mid the leaden rail, seven tongues of flame did shine o'er the lines of steel
By each shining blade a prayer was said that to Ireland her sons be true
And when morning broke still the war flag shook out its fold in the foggy dew

'Twas England bade our Wild Geese go that small Nations might be free
But their lonely graves are by Suvla's waves or the fringe of the great North Sea
O, had they died by Pearse's side, or had fought with Cathal Brugha
Their names we'd keep where the Fenians sleep, 'neath the shroud of the foggy dew

But the bravest fell and the requiem bell rang mournfully and clear
For those who died that watertide in the springtime of the year
While the world did gaze with deep amazeat those fearless men, but few
Who bore the fight that Freedom's light might shine through the foggy dew

Ah, back through the glen I rode again and my heart with grief was sore
For I parted then with valiant men whom I never shall see more
But to and fro in my dreams I go and I'd kneel and pray for you
For slavery fled, O glorious dead, when you fell in the foggy dew


From the Gaskell Political Dictionary:
Fenian. The Fenian movement was Irish in conception and purpose, but it began in [America]. The secret organization of the Fenian Brotherhood dates back to 1858, but the first Congress of the fraternity was held in Chicago, Nov. 3, 1863. In a general way all Irishmen in favor of Irish independence are sometimes called Fenians. The actual number at any time cannot be stated, but the fraternity was thought to number about 13,000 in 1861. At that time a constitution was promulgated and a republic for Ireland, much like our own, declared. James Stephens was the head of the movement. John O'Mahoney and O'Donovan Rossa were prominent. In 1865 the movement assumed such formidable proportions in Ireland that the leaders were arrested. Although Fenianism attracted a great dent [sic] of attention in America, and actually made a raid upon Canada with the base of operation on this side the line, the movement never had much bearing upon American politics, one way or the other.

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

The Foggy Foggy Dew


(Song begins at 3:56)
I figured out what the foggy, foggy dew refers to: it's literal. The situation is just being described ironically, since one doesn't really need to be saved from the foggy dew, so much. A lot like the song "Baby, It's Cold Outside". The really nice thing about this song, desite it's bawdy (if subtle) punchline, is that the guy becomes a single dad! That's cool. You raise that kid, brother.

Traditional
Rise Up Singing chapter: Time and Changes, p.223
D GE A D / D GE A D / A D A D / D GE A D

When I was a bachelor, I lived all alone, I worked at the weaver's trade
And the only, only thing I did that was wrong was to woo a fair young maid
I wooed her in the wintertime and part of the summer, too
And the only, only thing I did that was wrong was to keep her from the foggy, foggy dew

One night she knelt close by my side when I was fast asleep
She threw her arms around my neck, and she began to weep
She wept, she cried, she tore her hair. Ah, me! What could I do?
So all night long I held her in my arms just to keep her from the foggy, foggy dew

Again I am a bachelor, I live with my son, we work at the weaver's trade
And every sing time I look into his eyes he reminds me of that fair young maid
He reminds me of the wintertime and of the summer, too
And the many, many times that I held her in my arms just to keep her from the foggy, foggy dew

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Bonus: Lift Him Up, That's All (chorus only)


I lost a day somewhere over my 42-hour transit from Montreal back to Bangkok, so I'm posting a Ben Doerr bonus right now as, well, a bonus.
http://www.benjamindoerr.com

(Dr.) Ralph Stanley
Chords (chorus only): F - - - / F - - - / F - - B / F C F -

Here are the full lyrics, slightly corrected, from this page:

When Jesus was around here on this land
He certainly did do his Father's command
Because He knew that He was his Father's only son
He came to draw men unto Him

Oh lift Him up that's all
Lift Him up in His word
If you'll tell the Name of Jesus everywhere
If you'll keep His Name a ringing everywhere that you go
He will draw men unto Him

When Jesus met the woman at Jacob's well
He certainly did have a sweet message to tell
The woman commenced wondering because she seen He was a Jew
He came to draw men unto Him

Oh lift Him up that's all
Lift Him up in His word
If you'll tell the Name of Jesus everywhere
If you'll keep His Name a ringing everywhere that you go
He will draw men unto Him

When she learnt that it was Jesus she ran into the town
Saying come and see a man who told me all that I had done
Is this not the messenger which is called Christ?
He came to draw men unto Him

Oh lift Him up that's all
Lift Him up in His word
If you'll tell the Name of Jesus everywhere
If you'll keep His Name a ringing everywhere that you go
He will draw men unto Him

When He asked her for some water her sin she tried to hide
She commenced telling the Savior all about race pride
But woman if you just only knew the gift of God
I came to draw men unto me

Oh lift Him up that's all
Lift Him up in His Word
If you'll tell the Name of Jesus everywhere
If you'll keep his Name a ringing everywhere that you go
He will draw men unto Him

Monday, September 7, 2009

Be Thou My Vision

Natasha, opening: "This is dedicated to my sister, Tina. Page 40, be thou my vision."

Words, ancient Irish, translated by Mary E. Byrne (1880-1931); versified by Eleanor Hull (1860-1935); melody, traditional Irish ("Slane")
Rise Up Singing chapter: Faith, p.40
D GA - Bm - A D / A EmD - GD - A
G GD - D G - A / D GD - G D

I found the chord rhythm a little hard to catch on this one. Natasha had just taught it to me, so I'm really just trying to follow her. I recommend that's what you try to do too, I guess.

Lyrics (partial):
Be Thou my vision, O Lord of my heart
Naught be all else to me save that thou art
Thou my best thought, by day or by night
Waking or sleeping, they presence my light

Be Thou my wisdom and Thou my true word
I ever with thee and Thou with me, Lord
Thou my great Father, I thy true son
High King of heaven, my victory won

(There are 2 more verses I'll type out later)

Sunday, September 6, 2009

This Little Light of Mine

Recorded in Montreal. I really like having people to do these songs with. It's a little weird to always be demonstrating sing along songs alone. So this was a great change of pace.

Saturday, September 5, 2009

Lord of the Dance

Rise Up Singing chapter: Faith, I think
I'm flying home to Bangkok tomorrow morning! From whence I'll begin to add chords and lyrics to all the songs posted in the last 3 weeks.
See you tomorrow.
Matthew

Friday, September 4, 2009

They Call the Wind Mariah

Words by Alan Jay Lerner, music by Frederick Loewe
From the musical "Paint your Wagon"
Rise Up Singing chapter: Outdoors, p.157

C Am C Am / C Em FG C / C Am C -
F Em FG C / F - - - Em - - - / F - G - C - - -
Way out here they've got a name for rain and wind and fire
The rain is Tess, the fire's Joe and they call the wind Mariah

Wednesday, September 2, 2009

My Paddle

I hope you're all well. Here's a song for today. I've left camp now and am visiting Montreal, but the next 4 days' videos will still be from camp.
-Matthew

Tuesday, September 1, 2009